Enforced Disappearances: A Global Scourge, Increasingly Under the Radar

With the disappearances of Jamal Khashoggi, the head of Interpol in China, and thousands of others across the globe, I look at ‘short-term’ disappearances and the legal interpretation catching up to this increasingly prevalent phenomenon.

Truth Commissions and Colonial Atrocities: Moving the Needle Further Towards State Responsibility?

Discussions relating to a truth commission addressing colonial atrocities against the Ovaherrero and Nama peoples compelled me to look at the potential of truth commissions and to raise a few questions for further exploration.

“Surgical Strikes” Redux?: Ratcheting Tensions in South Asia

A brief post for Opinio Juris, within a few hours of the Indian air strike on JeM camps in Pakistan. A brief assessment of the Indian Foreign Secretarys statement - with a more detailed international law analysis to follow subsequently…

“Comfort Women”, the “Birangona” and historical war time sexual violence: Ignoring wounds of the past?

“Comfort Women”, the “Birangona” and historical war time sexual violence: Ignoring wounds of the past?

I attended the opening of the exhibition on Women & War at the Ayala Museum in the Philippines. Hearing a Lola - or grandmother who survived the ordeal of being a “Comfort Woman” - made me think of this issue more, and also look into the often forgotten '“Birangona” of Bangladesh. What hope for justice and redress?

Amnesties: Three Disparate Contexts, Similar Goals?

Amnesties: Three Disparate Contexts, Similar Goals?

Discussions relating to amnesties in the Central African Republic, Venezuela and Guatemala in the past week compelled me to look at these different contexts and to address questions relating to the feasibility and legality of amnesty laws.

Taking Statelessness Seriously: Linkages to Mass Atrocities?

My post on statelessness & the legal linkages to mass atrocities - an overlooked connection perhaps? Drawing from the Myanmar FFM report, a few preliminary thoughts and areas for future exploration...

Comment on “Internationalized Armed Conflicts in International Law”

As part of a book symposium for Opinio Juris, I comment on “Internationalized Armed Conflicts in International Law” by Kubo Mačák. The book is an insightful analysis of the tipping point at which non-international armed conflict (NIAC) may be ‘internationalized’ and considered an international armed conflict (IAC). I had a few thoughts, relating specifically to conflict in South Asia, and to the ‘humanization’ of international law.

Women in International Law: A Vanishing Act?

Women in International Law: A Vanishing Act?

A few thoughts on gender diversity in international law, sparked by the nominations for the UN International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals (IRMCT). I assess International courts, UN treaty bodies and mandate holders. The results are not pretty!